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Julian Davis
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Android Os VPN Assessments ? Finding A _VERIFIED_ Free VPN To Connect To Online



You can use any VPN to change your location online. However, some VPNs make it easier than others! Furthermore, some offer more server locations, faster speeds, or stronger security. Our methodology for finding the best VPNs for geo-spoofing takes all of this into consideration:




Android os VPN Assessments – Finding a Free VPN to Connect to Online



The second reason to pretend to be in a different country with a VPN is security. A VPN helps protect your online privacy. In countries with limited freedom such as China and Saudi Arabia, a VPN can be essential for avoiding government surveillance. A VPN secures your data with encryption and hides your location, protecting you from hackers and snoopers. Plus, if you choose a no-logs VPN, you can rest easy knowing that your personal information stays private at all times.


ProtonVPN does it all. It includes multi-hop connections and access to the Tor network via VPN, in addition to the usual VPN capabilities. It also sports a reimagined app interface for a pleasant user experience. While the core product has a dead-on average price, it also has the best free subscription we've yet seen.


When you switch on a VPN, it routes your web traffic through an encrypted connection to a server controlled by the VPN company. From there, your traffic exits onto the web as normal. If you make sure to only connect to websites secured with HTTPS, your data will continue to be encrypted, even after leaving the VPN. This sounds simple, but it can improve your privacy online.


With your VPN on, no one snooping around your network can see what you're up to. This is true even if the snooper controls the network. Public Wi-Fi networks, which are ubiquitous and convenient, are unfortunately also extremely convenient for attackers. How do you know, for example, "starbucks_wifi-real" is actually the Wi-Fi network for said coffee shop? In fact, a popular security-researcher prank is to create a network with the same name as a free, popular service and see how many devices automatically connect.


There's some debate among security experts about the efficacy of VPNs. Since most sites now support secure HTTPS connections, much of your online experience is already encrypted. Secure DNS products like Cloudflare 1.1.1.1 exist precisely because some feel VPNs are overkill. Still, a VPN covers the information not already protected by HTTPS, places an important buffer between you and the people controlling internet infrastructure, and makes online tracking harder.


For comprehensive anonymization of your traffic, you'll want to access the free Tor network. While a VPN tunnels your web traffic to a VPN server, Tor bounces around your traffic through several volunteer nodes which makes it much harder to track. Using Tor also grants access to hidden Dark Web sites, which a VPN simply cannot do. That said, some services, such as NordVPN and ProtonVPN, offer Tor access on specific servers. Note that Tor will slow down your connection even more than a VPN.


Not all VPN services require you to pay. There are, in fact, many excellent free VPNs. But all the free VPNs we've tested have limitations. Some limit you to just a few simultaneous connections or devices on an account. Others restrict your data or limit you to a handful of servers. Still others do all of the above.


Using a VPN with Netflix is easy, so long as your provider supports it. Sign up for a recommended VPN service from above and then follow these simple instructions.\nTo watch Netflix with a VPN, follow these steps or watch the video above:\n\nDownload and install the VPN software from your provider\u2019s website or an official app marketplace. Ensure you use a VPN that works with Netflix.\nSelect a VPN server in the US that can access Netflix. If you\u2019re unsure which one to choose, consult your provider\u2019s website or customer service.\nConnect to the VPN. Once the connection is established, open Netflix in a browser or app and start watching!\nIf you are still having problems, contact customer support. You may need to tweak a few settings on your device, such as IPv6 or DNS settings.\n","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/"}},"@type":"Question","name":"Why does Netflix ban most VPNs?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"Netflix views VPNs as a means of bypassing geographic licensing restrictions, meaning VPN users who use a VPN for other reasons are caught in the cross-fire. If it openly allows users to view a TV show in a country where it doesn't have the rights to stream it, it would breach those licensing restrictions. However, Netflix doesn't distinguish between users who live in other countries and those that are just visiting and want to access their home streaming services or between people who are abroad and those who just want to use a VPN for privacy and security.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"Why do we advocate for using a VPN with Netflix?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"A VPN is not simply a proxy tool to fool apps and websites into thinking the user is somewhere they are not. VPNs are in everyone\u2019s best interest when it comes to privacy. We wholeheartedly recommend everyone use a VPN, whether they are a Netflix subscriber or not.\nNetflix\u2019s VPN ban is a blunt instrument put in place to appease copyright holders. It blocks VPN users no matter where they are located so long as a proxy is detected. This is not a fair policy to paying subscribers. Forcing users to turn off their VPNs could sacrifice privacy, especially those connected on unsecured public wi-fi networks or traveling abroad to surveillance-heavy countries.\nYou have the right to use the VPN, and Netflix should respect that right by not forcing users to choose between privacy and entertainment.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"I\u2019m traveling and want to access US Netflix Abroad, which countries will these VPNs work in?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"The VPN services listed should allow you to access US Netflix in any country you might be traveling to, other than those where media is censored and VPNs are actively blocked by a firewall such as China (see our list of the VPNs working in China\u00a0and pick one that works there, too).\nIn pretty much every other country, the VPNs in our list will work. In fact, we\u2019ve received comments or emails from people in Canada, the UK, Germany, Australia, New Zealand, Switzerland, Finland, Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands, Denmark, Belgium, France, Israel, Spain, Ireland, South Africa, and Italy telling us they\u2019ve successfully accessed US Netflix!","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"Can I access Netflix libraries from countries other than the US with a VPN?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"A VPN that works with US Netflix won\u2019t necessarily be work with Netflix catalogs of other countries. While the US version of Netflix is highest in demand by far, we\u2019ve also made up lists of the best VPNs for a few other popular countries:\n\n\nBrazil\nFrance\nItaly\nSpain\nUnited Kingdom\nJapan\n\n","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"Is accessing the Netflix app with a VPN the same as watching Netflix in a web browser?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"Accessing the Netflix native app, such as the Netflix app for Android and iOS, is a little more challenging for VPNs than working with it in a web browser like Chrome or Firefox. Netflix can sometimes override the VPN's DNS servers and send requests to your nearest public DNS server. That means Netflix can determine your true location and block you accordingly, even with a VPN.\nHowever, all of the VPNs we recommend have overcome this hurdle, so it shouldn't be a problem.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"How do I watch Netflix on a device that doesn't support my VPN app like Chromecast, smart TV, Apple TV, PS4, or Xbox?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"If you want to watch Netflix with a VPN, but your device doesn't support any VPN apps, then you'll have to route that device's internet traffic through a router and configure the VPN on that router. This process varies depending on your router's firmware, and you might have to flash new firmware onto the router that supports VPNs, such as TomatoUSB or DD-WRT. Check with your VPN provider for router setup instructions.\nIf you don't feel comfortable configuring a VPN on your wi-fi router, then consider buying a pre-configured router like those available from ExpressVPN.\nAnother alternative is to use a laptop to create a VPN-enabled virtual router. This can be done on either Mac or Windows.\nLastly, if you have a device that supports screencasting, such as a Chromecast or Apple TV, you can connect to the VPN on a device that supports VPN apps and stream video from the Netflix device.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"Can I watch Netflix using a smart DNS proxy?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"Smart DNS proxies like Unotelly, Overplay, and Unblock-US were a flash in the pan during Netflix's war on proxies. After Netflix blocked connections from most VPN servers, many users switched to these services instead. A smart DNS proxy is a server that monitors any DNS requests sent from your device. DNS requests are a means of looking up which domain names (e.g. \"netflix.com\") are associated with which servers. If it detects a DNS request for Netflix, it sends all the browser web traffic for that request through the server to an American Netflix server, thereby changing both your public IP address and DNS server.\nThis approach worked for a few months until it caught the attention of Netflix, and a subsequent crackdown blocked most smart DNS proxy users. Today, a handful of smart DNS proxy services still work with Netflix, but the only one that's consistently worked for us is ExpressVPN's MediaStreamer service. MediaStreamer is a smart DNS proxy service that comes with every ExpressVPN subscription. It's used by default when you connect to the VPN, or you can set it up separately so that it's used on its own.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"Is it legal to use a VPN with Netflix?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"Yes. There is no law against using a VPN to watch Netflix.\nHowever, using a VPN to access another country's Netflix library is against the company's terms of use, which state:\n\u00a0\n\n\"You may view Netflix content primarily within the country in which you have established your account and only in geographic locations where we offer our service and have licensed such content. The content that may be available to watch will vary by geographic location and will change from time to time.\"\n\nAlthough Netflix does what it can to enforce this rule by blocking internet connections from most VPN providers, it does not penalize users who attempt to watch through a VPN. We\u2019ve not witnessed Netflix banning, suspending, or taking legal action against VPN users beyond simply blocking streams.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"Which Free VPN Works With Netflix?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"TunnelBear is the only VPN with a free tier that reliably works with Netflix. Unfortunately, it only offers free users 500 MB of data per month, which is only enough for about one episode of TV.\nMost free VPNs do not work with Netflix, and those that do probably won\u2019t work for long. Free VPNs just don\u2019t have the resources necessary to offer reliable access to Netflix without being blacklisted.\nAll of the VPNs we recommend above come with money-back guarantees, which you can take advantage of to watch Netflix for a month before asking for your money back. These VPNs have the resources and expertise to stay a step ahead of Netflix VPN bans.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Ti


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